Things Not To Say To An ADHD Child

The 2019 parenting seminar emphasizes that there is no right or wrong process for handling a child with ADHD. However, there are specific things that parents should consider. Managing a child with ADHD doesn’t follow a parental norm since it requires a significant amount of tolerance, understanding, and unconditional love. So here are the things parents should entirely try not to say to a child with ADHD.

“You’re Not Doing Anything Right”

There are instances when most parents will suddenly experience an emotional outburst. That is because there are moments that they will breakdown and won’t handle all the exhaustion of life. At times like this, it is vital not to throw any attention on an ADHD child for the fact that parents will soon begin to see several faults.

 

“Why Can’t You Listen?”

Honestly, it is not that an ADHD child intentionally tries not to listen. The thing is, the kid sometimes can’t focus, and parents should always remember that. A child with a mental disability cannot easily comprehend some instructions. That is why the child needs his or her parents to be patient and more understanding.

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“You Will Never Learn”

For most parents who are experiencing negative emotions, they sometimes cannot control their anger will soon lose compassion for their child. In unfortunate instances, these parents begin to lose confidence in everything their child does. With that, they pay less and less attention to the child’s capabilities.

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“You Don’t Need To Try Harder.”

Wrong! The more parents try to make their child feel incapable, the more the kid will suffer from emotional distress. The child will think that he will never be good enough because his parents cannot encourage him. Even a child with ADHD must understand that achieving great things in life requires hard work.

Why Quarantine Isn’t Too Bad For Autism Kids

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“The quarantine is not a walk in the park for adults and children alike.” That’s what the other moms in my circle of friends have been telling me ever since we have all been ordered to stay at home last March.

At first, the children were excited about the prospect of not going to school earlier than expected. They even showed interest in the online classes that the teachers organized for them. However, it eventually sunk in their minds that they could no longer go on play dates, swim with friends, or at least visit the local park. When they could have fun outdoors again, it would depend on when the experts could find a cure or vaccine for the coronavirus.

Of course, this new reality saddens me, too. I can sympathize with those kids and parents whose spring and summer plans have been ruined by the pandemic. Despite that, my son is not as profoundly affected as them.

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Perhaps it is because he is in the autism spectrum, which entails that he perceives situations differently from others. Although we do not leave the house for weeks on end, I don’t hear him complaining about it. My son is happy as long as he can play with toys.

If I can be more honest than that, I must admit that the quarantine may not be too bad for kids with autism.

They Have Little Things To Do At Home

My son transitioned to regular school from SPED last year. My husband and I were glad about it, but my child seemed to have a tough time coping with his new school and classmates. There was also a lot of homework and quizzes, which were dizzying for him.

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Now, because of the quarantine, my son needs to attend classes online. But unlike before, his assignments come far in between. The teachers cannot give group projects to the students, either. Thus, my son no longer feels rushed to handle schoolwork.

They Don’t Need To Get Out Of Comfort Zone All The Time

Most kids with autism have trouble letting people in their lives, and my son is not exempted from it. In truth, that’s how we found out several years ago that he has autism. While the kids were running around or singing along with the class, he would stay in his seat and not pay attention to anyone else.

Since then my little boy has gotten used to getting out of his comfort zone, but I can tell he feels exhausted from it sometimes. Thankfully, he can take a break from that until the next school year.

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They Don’t Get Bombarded With COVID-19 Updates

Furthermore, it is ideal for my autistic child to be at home these days because he cannot get bombarded with COVID-19 updates. That typically happens at school when the teachers and other kids gossip about what’s happening in and out of the country. If the classes continued regularly, it might be too overwhelming for my son.

Meanwhile, since my child gets homeschooled, I can relay information to him little by little. This way, he can understand why the coronavirus exists and how we can all avoid catching it.

Final Thoughts

Although the quarantine seems favorable for my child’s case, it does not mean that I don’t wish for the coronavirus to go away. I merely intend to look for the positive effects of this order to our family, and it turns out that it has done us a few good things. After all, if you keep on being cynical about it, you may not be able to use this opportunity to bond with your loved ones.